Google wins over its biggest cloud customer yet: Apple – Silicon Valley Business Journal

Apple is reportedly spending between $400 and $600 million for the services and will cut back on its dependency on Amazon Web Services.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.bizjournals.com

Apple recently began storing part of its iCloud and service data with Google’s cloud platform, according to CRN, citing sources close to the situation. Apple is spending between $400 and $600 million for the services. As a result, the Cupertino-based iPhone maker will cut back on its   A shift toward Google could indicate that Apple is in the midst of liberating its data from its competitors. Apple indicated on its earnings call in February that it is planning on building more of its own data centers, Apple has plans to open three new data centers within the next two years, giving the company a total of seven data centers globally. According to Re/Code, the team working on the project is known internally as “McQueen,” a reference to Steve McQueen in the film “The Great Escape.” The nickname alludes to Apple’s plan to break free from its competitors’ cloud services.  “We believe this build is a signal that Apple is increasingly likely to move away from AWS in the next 18-24 months,”dependency on Amazon Web Services (AWS), per the report.  

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus

Michael Kors New Smartwatches Making A Statement

Michael Kors has shown the world what he has planned in the wearables market with two watches that will ship in the Fall of 2016.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.valuewalk.com

Only two watches will make it to department stores and Michael Kors stores when they ship in the fall of 2016 ahead of the holiday shopping season. The wrists of women will have the opportunity to be adorned by a gold-plated wearable, while men will be treated to a sporty black number with both retailing for $395.   “We began by exploring a large number of designs, which we eventually narrowed down to a few body options,” Kors, chairman and chief creative officer, said. “There were many rounds of prototypes to get to the final product line.  “We looked closely at a range of colors and materials, so there were a lot of samples with various plating and material combinations before we arrived at the best options for both the watch and the straps. We also spent a lot of time exploring designs for the digital watch faces, because they’re an important part of what we are offering our customer.”   As each runs Android Wear, users will simply need either an Apple iPhone or one of the many Android options in order to get the true “smart” aspects from these timepieces. Those include but are not limited to: fitness/health tracking, text messages, email, and app notifications.  Both allow for customization  –  “It was important to us that the display watch was customizable, so users can incorporate their own personal style into their smartwatch,” Kors chairman and CEO John Idol told Mashable. “For example, through the day, customers will be able to change out straps or the watch face to reflect their mood or personal style.”   “Not only do we think the wearable technology business is going to grow in the future, we also saw the huge opportunity in the current space for products that look luxurious and focus on the design as well as functionality,” 

See on Scoop.itWearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)

Alphabet may ditch Boston Dynamics and its robot dreams

Frustrated with Boston Dynamics’ slow pace in building a marketable product, Google’s parent company Alphabet is apparently looking to unload robotics pioneer Boston Dynamics, which it acquired a little more than two years ago.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.computerworld.com

Frustrated with Boston Dynamics’ slow pace in building a marketable product, Google’s parent company Alphabet is apparently looking to unload robotics pioneer Boston Dynamics, which it acquired a little more than two years ago.

Alphabet is cutting its losses and looking to unload the company, according to a Bloomberg report. The company is known for its four-legged Big Dog and a slow-moving humanoid robot that became a video sensation.  Citing unnamed sources, Bloomberg also reported that Toyota Research Institute, a division of Toyota Motor Corp., and Amazon.com, which uses robots in its warehouses, are potential buyers.  Google bought Boston Dynamics with just a few weeks left in 2013 as part of a wide-ranging shopping spree of robotics companies.  The question remains, however, that if Alphabet sells Boston Dynamics, does that mean the company is backing away from robotics all together or simply offloading this one piece.

“If they’re selling Boston Dynamics, it would seem to me they’re moving away from robotics, as strange as that might sound,” said Jeff Kagan, an independent industry analyst. “I would think if Google was still interested in robotics, it would hang on to Boston Dynamics and possibly make another acquisition for shorter-term realization.”

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus