This Swatch watch will let you pay with your wrist

In its first foray into wearable tech, the Swiss watchmaker strikes a deal with Visa. The Swatch Bellamy will sport an NFC chip, enabling contactless payments.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.cnet.com

Swatch has partnered with Visa on a watch capable of making smartphone payments with the swipe of your wrist. The Swatch Bellamy, scheduled to launch in early 2016, can be used anywhere contactless Visa payments are accepted, the companies jointly announced Monday. It looks much like any other Swatch watch, but has an NFC (near-field communications) chip inside, giving it its payments power. Unlike other smartphones, the Bellamy doesn’t connect to the Internet and makes payments without using the watch’s battery.  Switzerland-based Swatch is the world’s largest watchmaker by revenue. It’s one of several traditional watchmakers collaborating with companies outside of their industry to make connected timepieces. Watchmaking for many years had seen little innovation, but partnerships that have sprung up in 2015 show the industry’s biggest names are now embracing change.

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BlackBerry to leave Pakistan after refusing to ditch user privacy

The Canadian company has taken a stand against demands for “backdoor” access to its services, including encrypted email and messages.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.cnet.com

BlackBerry will shut down operations in Pakistan at year’s end because demands from the country’s Telecommunications Authority would result in a massive invasion of user privacy, the company said Monday.  BlackBerry refuses to agree to the Pakistani government’s order to monitor BlackBerry Enterprise Services (BES), including encrypted emails and BBM messages sent and received in the country  “Pakistan’s demand was not a question of public safety; we are more than happy to assist law enforcement agencies in investigations of criminal activity,” Beard said. “Rather, Pakistan was essentially demanding unfettered access to all of our BES customers’ information.”  Governments, accustomed to tapping phone lines and opening mail in decades past, want access to people’s digital data to help stop crime and security threats. However, especially in the wake of revelations from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden about massive surveillance by the US and UK, tech companies have been wrestling with government data requests that they believe can go too far.

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How Samsung Became a Design Powerhouse

The electronics manufacturer now emphasizes design over efficiency.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: hbr.org

More detail on the Samsung Corporate Design Center and how it enables all of the different divisions within Samsung.  1st it was TRIZ methods being employed and deployed across the enterprise, and now it is design thinking too.  Interesting.

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Jawbone is building a health tracker you can swallow

In the future, consumers will monitor their health by swallowing health sensors.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: fortune.com

Consumable electronics are on the way to you via Jawbone, albeit this is likely to infringe on big Pharma’s move into this space, interesting vision presented on where this technology is going and how it can help us.

See on Scoop.itWearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)

This Disney Smartwatch Knows What You’re Touching and Tells You What to Do Next

Some smartwatches know your heart rate, and some know your location — but do any know what appliance you’re using, or what door you’re opening? A new device from Disney Research and Carnegie Mellon University does just that, then gives intelligent feedback suited for just that item or place.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.nbcnews.com

Disney in Wearable Tech?  Disney’s smartwatch knows your heart rate, and your location — and what appliance you’re using, or what door you’re opening. The system, called EM-Sense, works by carefully monitoring for the minute electromagnetic signals that propagate through your body whenever you touch anything — every object produces a different pattern, and the computer can be trained to recognize it. Combined with other information, it can guess that you’re on your way to work, fixing a specific meal or working on a certain project in the shop.  This electromagnetic detection of objects is a keen way to figure out what people are doing and using it as a feedback mechanism within the device, and presents the opportunity for a full range of practical daily use. 

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Microsoft is testing a wearable ‘clip’ for women

Microsoft is testing a wearable “clip” for women that is Cortana-enabled and can allow certain functions, such as setting reminders.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: uk.businessinsider.com

The project — described as a “hearable” — is a small device that can either be worn or used as an earpiece. The final implementation is unknown, and Microsoft is currently testing how people react to different prototypes, the report says.   Just as with the Moto Hint, Microsoft’s wearable would allow for quick interactions, such as reminders, making it ideal for a parent. According to Wareable, the target audience would be on-the-go women. 

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Here’s Apple’s idea for a smart ring

Apple has some interest in another wearable: smart rings. A patent application published today describes an interactive smart ring that could work in conjunction with larger devices, like a phone….

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.theverge.com

Apple’s idea for a smart ring, may have some traction, but it will likely play into the fashion side of people, the functionality will of course need to be of benefit.  Lots of opportunities for measuring biological measurements.  

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Johns Hopkins EpiWatch: App and Research Study

Johns Hopkins EpiWatch™ is an app for Apple Watch™ and research study. EpiWatch helps you manage your epilepsy by tracking your seizures and possible triggers, medications and side effects. You can view this information at any time, and a dashboard lets you share a summary of the data with your doctor or caregiver if you want. With EpiWatch, you can also send a message to family members or caregivers to let them know when you are having a seizure.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: m.hopkinsmedicine.org

 EpiWatch helps you manage your epilepsy by tracking your seizures and possible triggers, medications and side effects. You can view this information at any time, and a dashboard lets you share a summary of the data with your doctor or caregiver if you want. With EpiWatch, you can also send a message to family members or caregivers to let them know when you are having a seizure.

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IBM Watson Makes Health Care Debut on the Apple Watch

Health care goes cognitive.

The cognitive computing IBM Watson is pairing its artificial intelligence with the mobile sensing power of Apple’s smartwatch to create a health platform that can interact and adapt to each individual user.

It’s the first time Watson’s super computing power will be used with the Apple Watch to transform how people manage their wellbeing.

It all happens within an app called CaféWell Concierge, Powered by Watson, and developed by Welltok of Denver.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: fortune.com

The main features are :

  • Ability to ask health-related questions and receive personalized  responses
  • Inspiration and personalized tips related to diet, nutrition and exercise
  • Education on health benefits basics

You can also watch a hands-on video of the iPad App to get the principles. 

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The Next Wave of Wearable Tech Will Surprise You

Austin-based tech company Chaotic Moon is engineering a “smart” stick-on gadget: Tech Tats, they’re called. They’re applied just like the temporary tattoos of your childhood—stick on and wash off—except these high-tech tats can monitor vital signs, track GPS location, even hold credit card information.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.elle.com

The Tech Tattoos are compelling for their low-cost approach (this needs to be verified). The challenge is how to deliver power to their components ? Classic micro-batteries ? Piezo resistances?  Energy harvesting from the human body itself. Short time wearable devices, is there a market for that, likely yes, but Use Cases will need to be defined. More work to be done on the viability of this technology to be proven.

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