Internet Of Not-So-Smart Things: Samsung’s Latest Smart Fridge Can Expose Your Gmail Password

The sometimes blisteringly-inane hype surrounding the “Internet of Things” appears to be on a collision course with the sophomoric security standards being employed in the field. As we’ve seen time and time again, companies were so…

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.techdirt.com

Samsung, whose “smart” refrigerators aren’t so smart. While Samsung’s shiny new refrigerators connect to the Internet, can display your Google Calendar and implement SSL, hackers during a challenge at the recent DEFCON found the refrigerators fail to validate those SSL certificates. That opens the door to all kinds of man-in-the-middle attacks, potentially allowing your neighbor to steal your Gmail login information while sitting on his couch next door:   On the plus side, this vulnerability was found after Samsung invited hackers to try and find vulnerabilities in the system, showing some proactive thinking. On the flip side, this is the same company whose “smart” TVs were found to be happily sending living room conversation snippets unencrypted over the Internet — so it’s not always clear Samsung listens to feedback, or how many bugs and vulnerabilities go unnoticed. Regardless, the researchers’ blog post has a little more detail, noting they may have also found some vulnerabilities in the app’s encrypted communication stream with the refrigerator.

These endless IOT security issues may have the opposite effect of that intended: actively marketing the need for many devices to be dumber. And those dumb devices are getting harder to find. Many of the latest and greatest 4K television sets, for example, simply can’t be purchased without intelligent internals that integrate functionality the user may not want. So while Wired magazine’s endless 1990’s obsession with intelligent refrigerators may have finally come to fruition, they may be unwitting pitchmen for how sometimes it’s better for things to simply remain utterly analog — and beautifully, simply stupid.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus

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