Is this the smallest antenna for wearables?

1mm x 0.5mm x 0.5mm unit can add wireless connectivity to any small electronic device

Source: www.pcr-online.biz

Antenova has announced the Weii 2.4GHz ceramic antenna, which measures 1mm x 0.5mm x 0.5mm and is designed for all 2.4GHz, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, Zigbee and ISM applications.  –  It is designed specifically for the consumer, IoT and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) markets, and the omni-directional, SMD mounted dielectric antenna can be used to add wireless connectivity to any small electronic device, for example wearables, headsets, medical devices, PNDs, dongles and sensors

See on Scoop.itWearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)

Wearable medical technology has potential to detect emergencies, illnesses

Speaking at the ArabNet Digital Summit in Dubai, Empatica CEO and co-founder Matteo Lai said the wearable technology available today could, for example, detect epileptic seizures. Small, discreet wearable medical technology has the potential to detect emergencies and illnesses early on and even prevent diseases, according to the CEO of medical computing giant Empatica. At the moment, wearable tracking technologies are mostly being used to monitor sleep patterns or fitness data, such as how many

Source: en-maktoob.news.yahoo.com

Speaking at the ArabNet Digital Summit in Dubai, Empatica CEO and co-founder Matteo Lai said the wearable technology available today could, for example, detect epileptic seizures.
Small, discreet wearable medical technology has the potential to detect emergencies and illnesses early on and even prevent diseases, according to the CEO of medical computing giant Empatica. At the moment, wearable tracking technologies are mostly being used to monitor sleep patterns or fitness data, such as how many steps one has taken per day or the pace of a jog.   “Epilepsy is one of the most common brain diseases. It affects 65 million people worldwide,” he said. “The device we’ve developed measures several indicators, and also measures stress. We sell it around the world, to hospitals and research companies, and it has enabled research that wasn’t possible before.”

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

IBM and DARPA set the A.I. bar too low

A scientific approach to solve A.I. for language was spelled out in detail in the 1960s. DARPA’s plan and IBM’s adoption created progress, but not aimed at the full solution. Here I go through that plan, and explain why today’s alternatives don’t work – as predicted at the time. How to solve it means we have a path to follow that will work.

Source: www.computerworld.com

Speaking machines don’t exist despite being put on the wish list at the 1956 A.I. conference at Dartmouth College. That was nearly 60 years ago and we seem no closer to accurate speaking machines. What went wrong?  –  Yehoshua Bar-Hillel, a pioneer in machine translation and formal linguistics, identified in 1958 that a Universal Encyclopedia (UE) is needed before accurate machine translation is possible. The UE provides the mechanism to understand what was said and, once you know what is said, you can translate it accurately. At the time, a UE was considered beyond our capabilities.   A decade later, in 1969, John Pierce from Bell Labs proposed a higher-level solution. Roughly speaking, get the science right and then do the engineering. The science should explain how language works, implement it to the level of a human speaker, and then implement speech recognition.

If we follow the 1969 plan and include the 1958 requirement, we should be able to create accurate, speaking artificial intelligence.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

​Now more than ever, the Internet belongs to cord-cutters

69 percent of the Internet’s bandwidth goes to entertainment videos at peak hours.

Source: www.zdnet.com

Today, the Internet has become the go-to “place” for legal television and movie watching. It turns out that everyone who predicted that the solution to Internet piracy was to make digital downloads and streaming were right.  The old business models of broadcast content are still dealing with this new economic reality. But, just like digital ink did in traditional publishing, the Internet is now changing the media business once and for all.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

Intel’s Skylake chips to appear in tablets, PCs, servers

Intel has revealed more details about its next-generation chip code-named Skylake, indicating it will go into a broad range of tablets, PCs and servers.

Source: www.computerworld.com

Intel has hailed Skylake as its most important chip architecture in a decade and now says that it will be used in mainstream Core i3, i5 and i7 PC processors as well as Xeon server chips.   The first Skylake chip is expected to be Core M, designed to be used in Windows as well as Android tablets and hybrids.  The first Skylake PCs are expected to be available in the second half this year. Dell, for example, has said it will launch Skylake laptops in that time frame. Intel’s chips are used by most PC makers.  Intel is expecting big graphics performance improvements, longer laptop battery life, and better CPU performance with the new chips. Skylake will also allow users to wirelessly charge laptops, connect to monitors, and transfer data to peripherals.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus

Intel to unwrap ‘next-generation’ Thunderbolt in two weeks

Apple’s decision not to include Thunderbolt in its super-slim 12-inch MacBook hasn’t discouraged Intel from continuing development of the high-speed connector technology.

Source: www.computerworld.com

Apple’s decision not to include Thunderbolt in its super-slim 12-inch MacBook hasn’t discouraged Intel from continuing development of the high-speed connector technology.  –  Thunderbolt technology links computers to peripherals like external hard drives and displays, and can transfer data at faster speeds than USB. Thunderbolt ports are found in Macs and some Windows PCs.

The latest version of Thunderbolt, version 2.0, can transfer data at speeds up to 20Mbps (bits per second), which is twice as fast as the latest USB 3.1.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

Security as a service – how Brivo Labs uses identity for experiences, not hassles

Lee Odess of Brivo had a breakthrough: what if the same single sign-on features in the virtual world could be applied to building security as a service?

Source: diginomica.com

Three years ago, Les Odess of Brivo and his cohorts proposed using the same API-driven single sign-on companies use in the virtual world, and apply it to building security. Brivo’s leadership greenlighted Brivo Labs – basically a startup within Brivo – and Odess and his team went to work.  –  Fast forward three years: Brivo Labs is using security as a baseline service to build new models based on improving the user relationship to our physical surroundings.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

Software AG’s Internet of Things Top Trends

SYS-CON Media, NJ, The world’s leading i-technology media company on breaking technology news.

Source: www.sys-con.com

Software AG’s Top Internet of Things (IoT) Trends:
1. Don’t Gamble with IoT: Untrustworthy Things will be treated like gamblers in a casino – under close surveillance and approved until they misbehave. Traditional methods of on-boarding Things using explicit authorization will be insufficient as IoT proliferates.
2. Intelligence on Things gets up close and personal: As intelligence on the Internet of Things becomes critical to decision-making, it will become necessary for analytics to reside close to the Things being analyzed. Analytics will evolve both in the cloud and on the “outer edge”— either on the Thing itself or on a gateway nearby.
3. Say hello to your virtual assistant: IoT will enable consumers to adopt a “virtual assistant,” which will act in a semi-autonomous manner in the home — monitoring sensor-enabled Things to replenish light bulbs, order prescription medicines or buy groceries online. But consumers will demand assurances of security and privacy before embracing the trend.
4. Pay-as-you-go Things: The Internet of Things will accelerate the pay-as-you-go model for products. All products will be sold with something “smart” embedded within them. For example, a washing machine could be offered cheaply, or even for free, with the consumer only having to pay as it is used.

5. Wanted: mathematics teachers: As graduates are increasingly snapped up for Big Data analytics, the market will headhunt math teachers and professors out of schools and universities. Government offices of Innovation, Employment and (Advanced) Education need to wake up and take action.

6. Regulation will evolve: Regulators will learn that security attacks can come from any point in an IoT system and in unexpected ways; a bank could be breached via its smart building’s control system, or a city brought to its knees by someone infiltrating their smart city transport systems. They will have to evolve compliance and governance to provide a legal framework for IoT.

7. Smart cities tackle IoT risk: As cities get smarter with IoT, municipal governments will have to enact new regulation to ensure adequate risk management. For example, who is responsible if a smart traffic light fails and there is a multi-car accident? The city? The technology provider? The car manufacturer? Insurance risk will need to be considered in the connected world.

8. Prepare for data doomsday: Organizations will have to start building out robust, advanced solutions on specialized digital business platforms or they will perish in the inevitable data onslaught. Although 95% of companies expect to experience benefits due to the emergence of IoT in the next two years, a majority (65%) find that analyzing big data in real time is very difficult to achieve and nearly 75% are struggling to get proper analytics from their current data flow, according to recent survey.


See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

Effective data management: Driving success in the automotive industry

Every connected car has a wireless network that holds information about speed, acceleration, location and even on the drivers themselves. This data is useful to everyone from insurers to advertisers, who can use it to gain valuable access to their customers. But to be able to profit from this data deluge, the automotive industry needs to move fast to ensure its infrastructure is up to speed.

Source: www.m2mnow.biz

Every connected car has a wireless network that holds information about speed, acceleration, location and even on the drivers themselves. This data is useful to everyone from insurers to advertisers, who can use it to gain valuable access to their customers. But to be able to profit from this data deluge, the automotive industry needs to move fast to ensure its infrastructure is up to speed.  –  The key to success will be how the automotive industry chooses to manage its captured data. How a business deals with data will greatly affect its use. The selection of the right database will quickly become a decisive factor when it comes to processing, accessing and evaluating structured and unstructured information.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

Extremists fear the Web: politics, liberty and the new IoT

Digital media not only kill off propaganda, they let democracy advocates go viral. But there are still dangers

Source: www.salon.com

Digital media have not only been useful in killing off ideological propaganda, they have allowed democracy advocates to keep political memes alive and to make their issue go viral. Where ideologues and their ideologies do find traction and audience, it is usually because the messengers have been especially effective at using technology to promote their message and to keep their followers corralled, not because the rhetoric or ideas are compelling or sensible. This means that rival messengers, with better technologies, can get the upper hand in a political battle.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus