How Apple conducts Market Research and keeps iOS source code locked down

Recent court filings have revealed the extent of Apple’s in-house market research along with how it keeps iOS source code locked down

Source: www.networkworld.com

Although posted a couple years back, still relevant if you want to know if Apple does Market Research.   ” No iPhone-related surveys or iPad-related surveys are allowed to be distributed to anyone outside this group without my personal express permission, which I regularly refuse. When I do approve further distribution, it is almost always on a survey question-by-survey question basis, and even then distribution is limited to individuals  who have a demonstrated need to know.”  –  Apple’s Greg Joswiak – the company’s VP of Product Marketing runs a tight ship!  –  In sum, Joswiak asserts that if this information is made available to the public, Apple would suffer significant competitive harm and that competitors would subsequently be able to focus on the features that primarily attract both iPhone and iPad customers.  The need for confidentiality is even exacerbated, Joswiak argues, with respect to the iPad.

When iPad was first released in April 2010, there was no other product of its kind.  Obtaining information from July 2010 would be incredibly valuable to companies who are trying to put forward competing products. It shows in great detail how customer preferences have evolved over the time that iPad has been sold. Even if competitors could reliably survey Apple’s current customers (they cannot) to determine their preferences today, they certainly cannot reliably reconstruct what Apple customer’s preferences were in the past.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus

Turns Out Apple Conducts Market Research After All

Apple co-founder Steve Jobs notoriously shunned market research. He once quipped: “It isn’t the consumer’s job to know what they want.” That was Apple’s job.

Source: blogs.wsj.com

Apple co-founder Steve Jobs notoriously shunned market research. He once quipped: “It isn’t the consumer’s job to know what they want.” That was Apple’s job.  –  It is with a tinge of irony then that buried within the troves of court documents unsealed Thursday in the Apple vs. Samsung patent war is an “iPhone Owner Study” labeled “Apple Market Research & Analysis, May 2011.” It surveys users in multiple countries about why they bought an iPhone.

To be fair, Mr. Jobs mostly denounced focus groups, which are only one particular type of market research. And a company of Apple’s size can hardly be faulted for talking to its customers, particularly as rivals start courting them too.  –  The study points to Apple’s concern about the growth of Android, which eclipsed the iPhone in overall smartphone shipments that year. The big takeaways: Chinese customers remain some of the most enthusiastic about various iPhone features. And Apple’s brand and the design were far bigger drivers of iPhone purchases than software features and apps.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus

SIGFOX and TI collaborate to deliver cost-effective, long-range, low-power IoT connectivity

SIGFOX and Texas Instruments (TI) announced the two companies are working together to increase IoT deployments using the Sub-1 GHz spectrum.

Source: electroiq.com

Targeting a wide variety of end-user applications, including environmental sensors, smart meters, agriculture and livestock sensors, asset tracking and smart cities, the SIGFOX and TI collaboration maximizes the many benefits of narrowband radio technology and reduces barriers to entry for manufacturers wanting to connect their products to the cloud. Using the SIGFOX infrastructure reduces the cost and effort to get sensor data to the cloud and TI’s Sub-1 GHz technology provides years of battery life for less maintenance and up to 100 km range.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus

STEAMLabs launches IoT teaching kit to bring digital education to Canadian elementary schools

Source: www.newswire.ca

Key Facts:

  • Teachers need fresh tools to teach digital literacy programming. This need is even more pressing in areas of rapid change, such as Internet technology. The Internet of Things teaching kit is designed to help non-experts learn to teach fundamental principles of engineering and computer science in fun and engaging ways.
  • This past weekend at the TIFF digiPlaySpace, grade six students presented unique models of the Ontario power system that were built using the Internet of Things teaching kit. Students used 3D printing, Spark Core microcontrollers, LEDs and other electronics to build the model. They developed software programs with Arduino coding, HTML, CSS and Javascript and used real time data to demonstrate Ontario’s mix of power generation technologies and model the challenges facing the power system.
  • According to research by the .CA Community Investment Program and Ipsos Reid, 82 per cent of Canadians agree that young people should graduate from high school with basic skills to help them succeed in the digital economy, such as computer coding skills. The team at STEAMLabs directly supports this goal.
  • Analysts at IDC estimate that the Internet of Things Market will grow to $7.3 billion by the year 2020. Developing early literacy in these emerging technologies is critical to ensuring that students can understand this pervasive technology and seize new opportunities in this growing market.
  • STEAMLabs will be holding a free training session on June 5th for educators wishing to learn how to use the teaching kit.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

IoT Reaches Into the Trucking Business

Saia-Intel truck-tracking project shows the growing relevance of IoT to supply chain and logistics

Source: www.wsj.com

Saia LTL Freight Inc. began employing Internet-enabled Intel Corp. technology on its fleet of more than 3,000 trucks. Sensors installed on Saia’s vehicles enabled the company to track maintenance needs, driver safety, fuel usage and several other metrics in real-time. – Previously, those sensors recorded information on fuel consumption and other “vital statistics” on engine and driver performance, but the data was only gathered intermittently. Whenever trucks were in the shop for routine maintenance, for example, company analysts would plug a cable directly into the truck and download the information. That happened roughly monthly.  –  Now, all that information is available to Saia engineers on a real-time basis, using technology designed by Intel and a program developed by Vnomics Corp. With the installation of an antenna and a new computer on board, information on a vehicle’s fuel economy, location, and engine diagnostics gets sent back live to engineers in the company’s offices.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus

Trimble and MSFT Bring HoloLens Wearable Holographic Technology to the AEC Industry

Source: www.marketwatch.com

Microsoft HoloLens is a head-mounted, holographic computer that provides a mixed-reality experience for a range of commercial and consumer applications. When used by architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) professionals, the HoloLens device extends interaction with 3D models beyond the confines of a 2D computer screen, creating new ways for the many stakeholders of complex, multi-phase construction projects to visualize, collaborate, share ideas and manage change. 

See on Scoop.itLow Power Heads Up Display

Apple’s iPad remains dominant in shrinking tablet market

More than one out of every four tablets sold in the first quarter of 2015 bore an Apple logo, new data indicates, though the worldwide market for tablets and convertible devices continues to contract.

Source: appleinsider.com

Overall, the market was down 6% YOY, the second consecutive quarter in which sales fell. Of those tablets that were sold, cellular models were found to be the most popular, outpacing the market.

“Cellular-enabled tablets are outgrowing the rest of the market, providing an additional revenue stream for OEMs and mobile operators,” IDC tablet research director Jean Philippe Bouchard said in a release. “In addition to driving higher usage than Wi-Fi-only tablets, cellular-enabled tablets also help position the segment as true mobile solutions rather than stay-at-home devices.”

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Apple Watch Teardown, What Makes the Watch Tick

While most people are interested in how Apple’s just released Watch looks and operates, there is a group of people who also want to take a look under the hood. For these select few individuals ABIResearch’s TeardownIQ team pulled the back off one of the still quite hard to get Watches […]

Source: www.forbes.com

“This is the most elaborate watch we’ve seen yet. The overall complexity was eye opening. They [Apple] did not spare a dime on manufacturing,”   Mielke elaborated saying Apple always opted for the higher end component, which led not only to the device’s complexity, but its high manufacturing cost and finally its street price. ABI has not finished a complete count yet, but Meilke believes there are between 500 and 1,000 parts inside the watches case.  –  Two other points popped out at the ABI crew. First that the internal workings greatly resembled what is found inside an iPhone and the level of hardware-based security, as opposed to Internet-oriented security, that was included.  –   “The design is an obvious variation from Apple’s smartphones, with many high-end functions/chips included that normally would not be found in a simple watch,” Mielke said. “Judging by the complexity of the printed circuit board (PCB), and the number of parts on the PCB, one might think the Apple watch is a full-fledged cellular connected watch but in fact connectivity is limited to Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and NFC.”

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus

IoT coming to Banking

Will the future be all about your things’ connections? By now, most people have at least heard the term “internet of things” and have at least a hazy…

Source: www.bankingexchange.com

Accenture highlights six necessary investments in critical business capabilities:

1. Analytics—In the internet of things era, the volume of data available will explode. Banks need to continue investing in analytics capabilities to make sense of all this new data, in context with individual customers.

2. Tailored pricing—Equipped with a vast amount of granular data, tomorrow’s bank will need to design and provide products tailored to a specific customer’s needs at price points reflective of that customer’s overall financial position.

3. Distribution—Banks will need to be absolutely precise in the choice of distribution tools, applications, and methods used to communicate with each customer.

4. Agility—Banks will need to invest in developing their capacity for change as new technologies and infrastructures emerge.

5. Continuous innovation—Developing the capacity to innovate rapidly and successfully will enable banks to grow their customer base and increase customer value while fortifying their market position.

6. Digital risk management—The internet of things will enable banks to collaborate with their customers to better understand their needs, financial position, and collateral value—while automating much of the work involved in doing so. By gaining access to the data of their customers’ daily lives, the bank of things will be able to refine its credit models and improve its overall risk position

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus