How to Build a Safer Internet of Things

Illustration: J. D. King
Imagine a criminal using your nanny cam to watch your house or to scream at your child—or even to post footage of your home on a crime boss’s website.

Source: spectrum.ieee.org

Defensive Weapons: Rules-based filtering uses a small set of policies—such as no unauthorized remote updates of embedded firmware—to block dangerous commands from getting past a simplified firewall. Rules-based filtering systems can also consult white lists of trusted computers so that only “good guys” have access to certain functions. A “bump in the wire” approach relies on a small, dedicated piece of hardware and software that sits between an IoT device and the Internet; a bump in the wire can shield devices that don’t have built-in protection.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

Fever alarm armband: A wearable, printable, temperature sensor

University of Tokyo researchers have developed a “fever alarm armband,” a flexible, self-powered wearable device that sounds an alarm in case of high body temperature. This armband will be presented at the 2015 IEEE International Solid State Circuits Conference, San Francisco, on 22-26 February, 2015. The flexible organic components developed for this device are well-suited to wearable devices that continuously monitor vital signs including temperature and heart rate for applications in healthcare settings.

The new device developed by research groups lead by Professor Takayasu Sakurai at the Institute of Industrial Science and Professor Takao Someya at the Graduate School of Engineering combines a flexible amorphous silicon solar panel, piezoelectric speaker, temperature sensor, and power supply circuit created with organic components in a single flexible, wearable package.

Constant monitoring of health indicators such as heart rate and body temperature is the focus of intense interest in the fields of infant, elderly and patient care. Sensors for such applications need to be flexible and wireless for patient comfort, maintenance-free and not requiring external energy supply, and cheap enough to permit disposable use to ensure hygiene. Conventional sensors based on rigid components are unable to meet these requirements, so the researchers have developed a flexible solution that incorporates organic components that can be printed by an inkjet printer on a polymeric film.

The fever alarm armband incorporates several first-ever achievements. It is the first organic circuit able to produce a sound output, and the first to incorporate an organic power supply circuit. The former enables the device to provide audible information when the flexible thermal sensor detects a pre-set value within the ranges of 36.5 ºC to 38.5 ºC, while the latter increases the range of operational illumination by 7.3 times in indoor lighting conditions.

“Our fever alarm armband demonstrates that it is possible to produce flexible, disposable devices that can greatly enhance the amount of information available to carers in healthcare settings,” says Professor Someya. “We have demonstrated the technology with a temperature sensor and fever alarm, but the system could also be adapted to provide audible feedback on body temperature, or combined with other sensors to register wetness, pressure or heart rate.”

Source: www.eurekalert.org

See on Scoop.itWearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)

Samsung and Fitbit currently leading wearables markets

With the Apple Watch launch, and its potential to upend the wearables market, a few months away, Canalys reports that the current market leader for “smart wearable bands” — any wristworn device that can run third-party applications — is Samsung. Meanwhile, the “basic wearable band” market, which Canalys defines as wearables that can’t run apps, is still led by Fitbit.

The up-and-comer in the non-smartwatch wearable market is Xiaomi, whose focus on the Chinese market and low price point have catapulted it into the spotlight. It has shipped more than a million Mi Bands, 103,000 of those on the first day. 

“Though the Mi Band is a lower-margin product than competing devices, Xiaomi entered the wearables market with a unique strategy, and its shipment volumes show how quickly a company can become a major force in a segment based solely on the size of the Chinese market,” analyst Jason Low said in a statement.

Canalys didn’t share the total shipment numbers for basic bands, but said 4.6 million smart bands shipped in 2014, only 720,000 of which were Android Wear. Of those, Motorola led the market with its Moto 360.  Samsung led the smart band segment overall, owing to the wide range of devices the company has available.

“‘Samsung has launched six devices in just 14 months, on different platforms and still leads the smart band market,” VP and principal analyst Chris Jones said in a statement. “But it has struggled to keep consumers engaged and must work hard to attract developers while it focuses on [operating system] Tizen for its wearables.”

Canalys predicts Apple’s entry into the market will blow up the category, and says the device’s battery life will be the main advantage over Android Wear to begin with.

“Apple made the right decisions with its WatchKit software development kit to maximize battery life for the platform, and the Apple Watch will offer leading energy efficiency,” analyst Daniel Matte said in a statement. “Android Wear will need to improve significantly in the future, and we believe it will do so.”

Source: mobihealthnews.com

See on Scoop.itWearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)

GE’s New “Flexible” Factory in India is Changing How We Make Things

Source: www.gereports.com

This flexible “multi-modal” factory, which opened last Saturday, is as groundbreaking for India as it is for GE. It’s the first application of the concept that GE calls the “brilliant factory,” in which factory equipment and computers talk to each other over the Industrial Internet in real time, share information, and make decisions to preserve quality and prevent downtime. In such a factory, production lines are digitally connected to supply, service and distribution networks to maintain optimal production. “The brilliant factory is more than 3D printing parts from digital files, which we already do,” says Christine Furstoss, global technology director at GE Global Research. “We can build a factory that can make itself better.”

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus

The installed base of connected vending machines grew by 18% in 2014

The global installed base of connected vending machines grew by 18.4 percent to 1.16 million units in 2014. Around 0.56 million of these machines have been installed in North America, whereas 0.15 million of the machines were located in Europe. The number of connected vending machines in other parts of the world was 0.45 million, …

Source: m2mworldnews.com

The connected vending market has gained momentum as vending operators have started to deploy cashless payment systems and vending telemetry solutions at a larger scale. The main market driver is currently cashless payments, which has become more and more important as the world moves from coins and bills to electronic payments such as credit cards and mobile wallets. Vending telemetry solutions are expected to have a more transformational effect on the industry in the coming year

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

Wearable Device Allows Clinicians to See “Through” A Patient’s Skin

Wearable Device Allows Clinicians to See “Through” A Patient’s Skin

Source: hitconsultant.net

Evena’s point-of-care Eyes-On system is the first vein detection device to deliver clear, anatomically accurate, real-time imaging in a wearable, easy-to-use, hands-free and cart-free system. The system has telemedicine capabilities to share images remotely and interfaces with a hospital’s EMR systems for seamless documentation.

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus