Did Intel’s SSDs Undermine Its Processor Sales?

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus

Intel has been facing trouble lately due to slower unit shipments in its key markets.  The PC and server markets are undergoing radical changes, and although most analysts blame other factors, the advent of the SSD (solid-state disk) may really be to blame. Although it’s commonly believed that PC unit shipments […]

Richard Platt‘s insight:

A very likely scenario on why microprocessor sales are flat at Intel, and who would’ve thought that it was Solid State Drives as the cause.  ” If this is, in fact, the case, then Intel’s PC processor business should regain its former growth relatively soon (but not server microprocessor growth). Such an outcome would be an ironic twist for Intel, but over the long term it should amount to little more than a bump in the road.”

See on www.forbes.com

Advertisements

Engineer as Life Saver – the GM Recall and Why

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

A $30 replacement part helped set in motion General Motors’ recall of 2.6 million Chevrolet Cobalts and other cars, and one of the gravest safety crises in company history.

Richard Platt‘s insight:

The number of deaths related to this faulty switch issue, 13.

G.M. added 971,000 later model Cobalts and other cars to the recall.  

Mr. Hood’s research could also play a part in class-action suits filed against G.M. covering all owners of Cobalts and other vehicles in the recall.

He said his investigation was nothing extraordinary in scope, just a meticulous breakdown of a commodity auto part found in millions of vehicles.  – they ought to give the guy a medal.

You gotta love the independent “outsider” engineer who tells you your stuff is crap and why, the cost might not just be a lawsuit but you might just kill someone.  

Hire an independent professional every time, 

See on www.nytimes.com

Top 10 Legal Mistakes By Early-Stage Entrepreneurs

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

From Salt Lake City attorney at law Andrew Buffmire, the 10 top mistakes early stage technology companies make.

Richard Platt‘s insight:

Mostly good advice for start ups.  The IP issue is always tricky, bottom line if you aren’t required to share it to cut a deal, don’t. Patents aren’t cheap, except provisional one’s but those only last a year.  As it turns out regular patents are really only useful when you’re at scale (mass deployment) and can and do need to defend in court against infringers or patent trolls.  Bottom line about IP, particularly cash strapped, get a lot of advice (legal, business and technologically) on whether you need to get the protection when you actually need it.  Get it too early and you spend precious cash reserves, get it too late and your IP is worthless and someone in China is building your stuff.

See on www.forbes.com

Big Data’s Big Impact Across Industries

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

I’m not sure what prompted the deluge of big data stories this week and last, but it looked as if someone from every major industry was looking at the impact of being able to glean data from multiple data sources, structured and unstructured, from health care to agriculture and more. […]

Richard Platt‘s insight:

Interesting

See on www.forbes.com

Microsoft Decides It’s Actually A Bad Idea To Snoop Through Users’ Emails

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus

When Microsoft got outed for abusing its access to a journalist’s Hotmail account to finger an info-leaking employee, it initially defended its right to do so, but now the company has changed its tune.

Richard Platt‘s insight:

The whole issue of personal data privacy and security is up again. Now MSFT has to deal with the issue of user information privacy, and do so legally. the backlash was significant enough to be accused of superseding the rights of private citizens, even if they potentially steal IP.  Google and Yahoo will have to face this too.

See on www.forbes.com

HootSuite CEO: How millennials can think beyond the selfie – Fortune Tech

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Company and Research Focus

Here are 5 Social Media skills they (desperately) lack.

Richard Platt‘s insight:

According to Ward, who has 13,500 Twitter followers and teaches a series of popular undergraduate and graduate courses on social media at the university, millennials are lacking in a number of critical areas. While they’re very good at connecting with people they already know, they often fail to understand the professional opportunities and pitfalls posed by networks like Twitter (TWTR), Facebook (FB), LinkedIn (LNKD), and Instagram.”

See on tech.fortune.cnn.com

XOEye Shares Their Vision On Wearable Technology

See on Scoop.itWearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)

XOEye’s James Beecham and Anthony Blanco meet with Skyhook at CES 2014 to shed insight on the future of wearable technology.

Richard Platt‘s insight:

Finally someone with the Use Case that we understood  – “

Imagine sending a repair technician to fix a cortical machine and he or she gets stuck. We can send visuals, video and stills to other experts, reducing travel costs, getting equipment fixed faster, improving processes and bringing the world closer. 

This way, we can reduce workman’s complications. We can catalog the work during the day and optimize processes while making safety practices better. We can measure the movement of workers with our accelerometer and find more ways to optimize a person’s work style.” 

See on blog.skyhookwireless.com

Lifelogger Talks to Skyhook Wireless About the future of Wearable Cameras

See on Scoop.itInternet of Things – Technology focus

Stew Garner of LifeLogger talks to Skyhook’s SchneiderMike about the future of their wearable camera.

Richard Platt‘s insight:

We want two cameras to record in stereo but battery limits don’t let us do that yet. Our communication is fast, but better battery life will make it faster. This is something we are working on.

See on blog.skyhookwireless.com

Recon Talks to Skyhook Wireless About Wearable Technology

See on Scoop.itWearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)

One differentiator between the Recon Eyewear and Google Glass is the placing of the computer monitor.  Recon Jet and Recon Snow2 have a microcomputer at the bottom of the field of vision rather than at the top.  Athletes will benefit from the Recon Jet due to the built in sensors that cater to endurance sports.  Skyhook met with (name and position) at the CES event in Las Vegas to learn more about Recon and their ideas on Wearable Technology trends.

Richard Platt‘s insight:

One differentiator between the Recon Eyewear and Google Glass is the placing of the computer monitor.  Recon Jet and Recon Snow2 have a microcomputer at the bottom of the field of vision rather than at the top.  Athletes will benefit from the Recon Jet due to the built in sensors that cater to endurance sports.  

See on blog.skyhookwireless.com

Apple engineer recalls the iPhone’s birth

See on Scoop.itWearable Tech and the Internet of Things (Iot)

Steve Jobs gave senior software engineer Greg Christie an ultimatum: Lay out a vision for what would become the iPhone in two weeks or another group would take on the project.

Richard Platt‘s insight:

The detailed story on how an innovation came to be at Apple, the detail of which will likely derail Samsung’s patent infringement defense.  

See on online.wsj.com